Osteoarthritis

Authors: JULIEN OLIVE 1 , MARC-ANDRÉ D'ANJOU 2 , KATE ALEXANDER 2 , SHEILA LAVERTY 2 , CHRISTINE THEORET 1
Journal: Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound

We compared the ability of 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and computed radiography (CR) to evaluate noncartilaginous structures of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP), and the association of imaging changes with gross cartilage damage in the context of osteoarthritis.

Category: Equine - MRI - Osteoarthritis
Authors: SPENCER M. BARBER, DVM, Diplomate ACVS 1 , LUCA PANIZZI, Dr Med Vet 1 , and HAYLEY M. LANG 1
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective—To evaluate arthrodesis as a treatment for carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis (CMC-OA).

Study Design—Case series.

Animals—Horses (n=12) with CMC-OA.

Methods—Arthrodesis was facilitated by insertion and fanning of a drill bit into the CMC joint at several (3–5) locations in 15 limbs. Follow-up radiographs were obtained for 7 horses (9 limbs). Outcome was determined by telephone survey of owners based on postoperative pain, return to use, appearance of the limb, and success of treatment.

Authors: LUCA PANIZZI, DrMedVet, MVetSc 1 , SPENCER M. BARBER, DVM, Diplomate ACVS 1 , HAYLEY M. LANG 1 , and JAMES L. CARMALT, MA, VetMB, MVetSc, Diplomate ABVP & ACVS 1
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective—To describe signalment, clinical, and radiographic changes associated with carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (CMC-OA) and to report long-term outcome.

Study Design—Case series.

Animals—Horses (n=33) with CMC-OA.

Methods—Medical records (1992–2007) of horses diagnosed with CMC-OA were reviewed and signalment, clinical, and radiographic findings retrieved. Owners were contacted for information on the impact of lameness on intended use, response to treatment, progression of lameness, outcome, and owner satisfaction with response to treatment.

Category: Equine - Osteoarthritis
Authors: Olive, J.; D'Anjou, M.-A.; Girard, C.; Laverty, S.; Theoret, C.L.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: Marginal osteophytes represent a well known component of osteoarthritis in man and animals. Conversely, central subchondral osteophytes (COs), which are commonly present in human knees with osteoarthritis, have not been reported in horses.

Objectives: To describe and compare computed radiography (CR), single-slice computed tomography (CT), 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological features of COs in equine metacarpophalangeal joints with macroscopic evidence of naturally-occurring osteoarthritis.

Authors: Oosterlinck, M.; Pille, F.; Gasthuys, F.; Saunders, J.H.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Education

An 8-year-old Paint Horse gelding was evaluated for a persistent left forelimb lameness (grade 4/5), with a hard swelling at the dorsomedial aspect of the carpometacarpal joint, due to osteoarthritis. Previous systemic and local anti-inflammatory therapy had only a temporary effect. Partial carpal arthrodesis was suggested, but the owner elected for conservative treatment. The horse was confined to a small paddock and received phytotherapeutic supplementation with Harpagophytum procumbens. The lameness gradually resolved but a similar hard swelling developed on the right carpus.

Authors: P. Jones, M. Delco, W. Beard, J. D. Lillich, A. Desormaux
Journal: Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology

Osteoarthritis of the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) is a common cause of chronic lameness in the horse that requires surgical arthrodesis when medical management is no longer able to alleviate pain. Surgical principles for successful PIPJ arthrodesis include articular cartilage debridement and rigid fixation. To completely debride articular cartilage, the collateral ligaments and extensor tendon are transected, disarticulating the joint.

Authors: Jorge U. Carmona, Marta Prades
Journal: Compendium Equine

Osteoarthritis (OA) in horses is a chronic, degenerative process. Affected horses typically have clinical evidence of synovitis, varying degrees of lameness, and progressive loss of joint function. The inciting cause of OA remains unclear; however, factors such as repeated episodes of trauma, joint instability, synovitis–capsulitis, hypoxia and neovascularization, genetic predisposition, and obesity have been related to its development.

Category: Equine - Osteoarthritis
Authors: David D. Frisbie, DVM, PhD; C. Wayne McIlwraith, BVSc, PhD; Chris E. Kawcak, DVM, PhD; Natasha M. Werpy, DVM; Gregory L. Pearce, MStat
Journal: American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract
American Journal of Veterinary Research
February 2009, Vol. 70, No. 2, Pages 210-215
doi: 10.2460/ajvr.70.2.210

Evaluation of topically administered diclofenac liposomal cream for treatment of horses with experimentally induced osteoarthritis

David D. Frisbie, DVM, PhD; C. Wayne McIlwraith, BVSc, PhD; Chris E. Kawcak, DVM, PhD; Natasha M. Werpy, DVM; Gregory L. Pearce, MStat

Authors: David D. Frisbie, DVM, PhD; Chris E. Kawcak, DVM, PhD; C. Wayne McIlwraith, BVSc, PhD; Natasha M. Werpy, DVM
Journal: American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective—To assess clinical, biochemical, and histologic effects of polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG) or sodium hyaluronan administered intra-articularly in treatment of horses with experimentally induced osteoarthritis. Animals—24 horses. Procedures—Osteoarthritis was induced arthroscopically in 1 middle carpal joint of all horses. Eight horses received hyaluronan (20 mg) and amikacin (125 mg) intra-articularly on study days 14, 21, and 28. Eight horses received PSGAG (250 mg) and amikacin (125 mg) intra-articularly on study days 14, 21, and 28.

Authors: Byam-Cook, K.L.; Singer, E.R.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: Despite the possibility that sound horses may have radiographic signs consistent with osteoarthritis of the small tarsal joints (OA-STJ), a diagnosis of 'bone spavin' as a cause of lameness is often made based only on radiographic examination. Objectives: To determine whether severity of radiographic change and response to treatment are correlated with the duration and degree of lameness and the response to intra-articular anaesthesia in horses with OA-STJ.