Tendon and Ligament Injuries

Authors: Daniel J. Duffy, Weston L. Beamon, Yi-Jen Chang, George E. Moore

OBJECTIVE To compare the biomechanical properties and gapping characteristics following loop modification of a 3-loop-pulley (3LP) pattern in an ex vivo canine common calcaneal tendon (CCT) avulsion repair model.

SAMPLE 56 skeletally mature hindlimbs from 28 canine cadavers.

Authors: S M M Colthurst, J O Simcock, R G Cashmore

Objectives: To investigate whether a difference exists in incidence of medial meniscal tears between small (≤15 kg) and medium-to-large (>15 kg) dogs with naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament disease.

Authors: Kimberly A Agnello, Dorothy Cimino Brown, Samuel G Zyla, Kei Hayashi

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the arthroscopic changes to the caudal cruciate ligament (CdCL) in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease.

Authors: Johanna S Evers, Stanley E Kim, Matthew D Johnson, Matthew A Lazarus

Objective: To determine the accuracy of needle arthroscopy (NA) for the diagnosis of medial meniscal tears in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR).

Study design: Prospective clinical trial.

Animals: Twenty-six client-owned dogs.

Authors: Lauren A Kmieciak , Karanvir S Aulakh, Tisha A M Harper, Mark A Mitchell, Ryan J Butler, Chin-Chi Liu, Harmeet K Aulakh

Objective: The main aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of stifle exploratory using either a stifle distractor (SD method) or a combination of Hohmann and Senn retractors (HS method) for diagnosing canine medial meniscal tears in cranial cruciate ligament-deficient stifles.

Authors: Sebastian Prior, Francisco Silveira, Lida Pappa, Pablo Pérez López, Robert Quinn, Darren Barnes

Background: This study aimed to determine whether Blumensaat's line, a consistently present radiographic feature delineating the peak of the femoral intercondylar fossa, could be used to assess for cranial tibial subluxation in canine stifles with cranial cruciate ligament disease.

Authors: Petar Polajnar, Zsigmond Szanto, Florian Willmitzer, Nikola Medl

A 9-year-old, neutered, male, Cairn terrier dog presented with a 3-year history of progressive pain and lameness of the right hindlimb. After an acute episode of severe pain and non-weight-bearing lameness, the dog was referred to our clinic for evaluation.

The physical examination was unremarkable; the orthopaedic examination revealed a positive cranial drawer sign and medial patellar luxation grade 3/4. Orthogonal radiographs were taken. Chronic degenerative changes consistent with cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency and medial patellar luxation were noted.

Authors: Brunella Restucci et al.

The etiology of spontaneous cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs is unknown despite being one of the most impacting orthopedic diseases in dogs.

Authors: Yi-Jen Chang, Daniel J Duffy, Wes Beamon, George E Moore

Objective: To evaluate the effects of using an internal fixation plate to augment primary 3-loop pulley (3LP) repair of canine gastrocnemius tendons (GTs).

Sample: 48 cadaveric GTs from 24 adult dogs.

Authors: A Tikekar, F De Vicente, A McCormack, D Thomson, M Farrell, S Carmichael, D Chase

Aims: To compare short and long-term outcomes after tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) and lateral fabello-tibial suture (LFTS) techniques for the management of cranial cruciate ligament disease in small dogs with high tibial plateau angles (TPA).