Tendon and Ligament Injuries

Authors: Guidong Shi, Yicun Wang, Zhanwen Wang, Andrew R Thoreson, Daniel S Jacobson, Peter C Amadio, Atta Behfar, Steven L Moran, Chunfeng Zhao

Reducing tendon failure after repair remains a challenge due to its poor intrinsic healing ability. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of a novel tissue-engineered purified exosome product (PEP) patch on tendon healing in a canine ex vivo model.

Authors: Cristina Bernardi-Villavicencio, Antonio Nicolas Jimenez-Socorro, Concepcion Rojo-Salvador, Javier Robles-Sanmartin, Jesus Rodriguez-Quiros
Authors: Adam C Eby, Daniel J Duffy, Yi-Jen Chang, Lewis Gaffney, Matthew B Fisher, George E Moore

Objective: To determine the influence of barbed epitendinous sutures (ES) on the biomechanical properties and gap formation of repaired canine tendons.

Study design: Ex vivo, experimental study.

Sample population: Eighty (n = 16/group) canine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT).

Authors: Daniel J Duffy, Yi-Jen Chang, Matthew B Fisher, George E Moore

Objective: To determine the effect of partial vs complete circumferential epitendinous suture (ES) placement in addition to a core suture on the biomechanical strength and gapping characteristics of repaired canine tendinous constructs.

Study design: Ex vivo, biomechanical study.

Sample population: Thirty-six canine superficial digital flexor tendons.

Authors: Cheslymar Garcia, Marian E Benitez, David C Grant, Sabrina L Barry

Objective: To determine the prevalence of subclinical bacteriuria (SBU) in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) disease, the clinical variables and clinicopathologic data associated with SBU, and the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) in dogs with and without SBU.

Study design: Prospective, clinical cohort study.

Animals: One hundred fifty-five dogs with CCL disease.

Authors: Cássio Ricardo Auada Ferrigno, Alexandre Navarro Alves de Souza, Márcio Poletto Ferreira, Valentine Verpaalen, Julia Maria Matera

Objective: Our objective was to compare the peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) between dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease and a tibial plateau angle (TPA) greater or less than 25 degrees.

Authors: Ana Bascuñán, Mariajesus Soula, Kristina K Millar, Adam Biedrzycki, Scott A Banks, Daniel D Lewis, Stanley E Kim

Although the goat is an established animal model in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) research, in-vivo kinematics associated with ACL deficiency have not been previously described in this species.

Authors: M Lampart, S Knell, A Pozzi

Cranial cruciate ligament rupture is one of the most important diseases in canine orthopedics. Despite the frequent occurrence of the disease and the extensive literature available, there is still controversy about the best treatment method.

Authors: Gudrun S Boge, Karolina Engdahl, Annika Bergström, Ulf Emanuelson, Jeanette Hanson, Odd Höglund, Elena R Moldal, Eystein Skjerve, Randi Krontveit

Objective: To analyse the effect of treatment method and other risk factors on survival in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD).

Authors: Daniel J Duffy, Chiara P Curcillo, Yi-Jen Chang, Lewis Gaffney, Matthew B Fisher, George E Moore

Objective: To evaluate the effect of an autologous flexor digitorum lateralis (FDL) graft to augment a three-loop pulley (3LP) core repair in a canine cadaveric gastrocnemius tendon (GT) laceration model.

Study design: Ex vivo, biomechanical study.

Sample population: Twenty-six canine cadaveric hind limbs.