Oncology

Authors: Boston SE, Barry M, O'Sullivan ML.
Journal: Can Vet J

A 7-year-old, spayed, female great Pyrenees with a primary tumor of the distal radius was treated with placement of a bone plate that spanned the tumor. The goals were palliation and prevention of pathologic fracture. This is an option for select patients with osteosarcoma.

Authors: Carotenuto AM, Ravasio G, Fonda D, Stefanello D.
Journal: Can Vet J

We describe a case of proximal mandibular nerve block with ropivacaine, using electrolocation, for perioperative pain management in a geriatric dog undergoing rostral mandibulectomy. The patient did not require intraoperative analgesia or analgesic supplementation for 8 h after the end of the surgery.

Authors: Gibbons DS, Bennett AD, Treuil PL.
Journal: JAAHA

Synovial sarcoma is a rare tumor in dogs, occurring in approximately 27% of neoplasms involving joints, with the elbow representing a common site of occurrence. The recommended treatment of canine synovial sarcoma is amputation. The authors describe the use of palliative radiation therapy for the treatment of synovial sarcoma involving the elbow of a dog and conclude that this treatment modality may have use in some patients affected with synovial sarcoma.

Category: Oncology
Authors: Szabo D, Ryan T, Scott HW.
Journal: VCOT

Carpal canal syndrome, or carpal tunnel syndrome, is the most common entrapment neuropathy in humans and is caused by compression of the median nerve as it courses through the carpal canal. A similar condition has been reported in horses, however there have not been any reported cases of a dog showing lameness secondary to compression within the carpal canal. This report describes the case of a dog exhibiting lameness secondary to a lipoma within the carpal canal. Lameness improved after surgical removal of the mass.

Authors: Klahn SL, Kitchell BE, Dervisis NG.
Journal: JAVMA

Objective-To evaluate and compare the outcomes of dogs with periarticular histiocytic sarcoma (PAHS) and histiocytic sarcoma of other anatomic locations (non-PAHS) and identify factors associated with outcome for dogs with PAHS. Design-Retrospective cohort study. Animals-19 dogs with PAHS and 31 dogs with non-PAHS. Procedures-Medical records of dogs with histiocytic sarcoma that underwent definitive local treatment (surgery or radiation), chemotherapy, or a combination of these were reviewed.

Category: Oncology
Authors: Boston SE, Bacon NJ, Culp WT, Bhandal J, Bruce C, Cavanaugh RP, Hamilton MH, Lincoln JD, Liptak JM, Scharvogel S.
Journal: Vet Surg

Objective: To report outcome in dogs after internal fixation of a sarcoma-related pathologic fracture of the appendicular skeleton. Study Design: Multi-institutional case series. Animals: Dogs (n=16). Methods: Medical records of participating VSSO members were reviewed for dogs with pathologic fracture associated with a confirmed bone sarcoma of the appendicular skeleton repaired by external or internal fixation. Dogs were included if they had a histological diagnosis of osteosarcoma or sarcoma and excluded if they had radiation before fracture.

Authors: Bhandal J, Boston SE.
Journal: Vet Surg

Objective: To evaluate clinical presentation of pathologic fractures associated with suspected or confirmed osteosarcoma in dogs and to assess treatment and survival times. Study design: Case series. Animals: Dogs (n=25) appendicular pathologic fracture. Methods: Medical records (January 1997-May 2008) of dogs with pathologic fracture associated with a suspected or confirmed osteosarcoma were reviewed. Dogs were included if they had radiographic evidence of a pathologic fracture and a presumptive or definitive diagnosis of osteosarcoma.

Authors: Fiani N, Arzi B, Johnson EG, Murphy B, Verstraete FJ.
Journal: JAVMA

Objective-To describe clinical features of oral and maxillofacial osteomas in cats. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-7 cats with oral or maxillofacial osteoma or both. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed for information on signalment, history, clinical signs, physical examination findings, diagnostic imaging findings, results of serum biochemical analyses and histologic testing, surgical procedures performed, and perioperative complications. Outcome was determined on the basis of follow-up telephone interviews of owners. Results-Cats ranged from 1 to 23 years of age.

Category: Oncology
Authors: Hodge SC, Degner D, Walshaw R, Teunissen B.
Journal: JAAHA

The objective of this retrospective study was to compare vascularized free or roll-in ulnar bone grafts for limb-sparing surgery in dogs with radial osteosarcoma with the cortical allograft, metal endoprosthesis, or distraction osteogenesis techniques. Overall, the ulnar graft techniques used in this study demonstrated excellent healing properties. Complications included recurrence of the tumor in 25% (2/8) of the dogs, metastasis in 50% (4/8) of the dogs, implant loosening in 37.5% (3/8) of the dogs, implant failure in 12.5% (1/8) of the dogs, and infection in 62.5% (5/8) of the dogs.

Authors: Y. Fourie (1), D. Heidenreich (1), P. Barreau (1)
Journal: VCOT

A 10-year-old, male, neutered whippet was presented with a soft tissue mass located on the medial aspect of the distal right tibia. The mass was 4 cm in diameter and of two months duration. Recent biopsy by the referring veterinarian, prompted by noticeable enlargement, identified the mass as a soft tissue sarcoma. Staging assessments did not reveal any evidence of metastases. Marginal excision was performed.

Category: Oncology