Oncology

Authors: Clarke BS, Findji L.
Journal: JAVMA

Case Description-A 10-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was admitted for treatment of a mass affecting the right scapula. Clinical Findings-A firm soft tissue mass located over the craniolateral aspect of the right scapula was evident during palpation. The mass extended close to the shoulder joint but did not cause lameness of the affected limb. Treatment and Outcome-Examination of a biopsy specimen obtained from the mass ndicated chondrosarcoma. Total scapulectomy was performed to allow wide excision of the tumor.

Category: Oncology
Authors: Anfinsen KP, Grotmol T, Bruland OS, Jonasdottir TJ.
Journal: Can J Vet Res

This is one of few published population-based studies describing breed specific rates of canine primary bone tumors. Incidence rates related to dog breeds could help clarify the impact of etiological factors such as birth weight, growth rate, and adult body weight/height on development of these tumors. The study population consisted of dogs within 4 large/giant breeds; Irish wolfhound (IW), Leonberger (LB), Newfoundland (NF), and Labrador retriever (LR), born between January 1st 1989 and December 31st 1998.

Category: Oncology
Authors: Atherton MJ, Arthurs G.
Journal: JAAHA

A 7 yr old spayed female mastiff presented for examination of a left pelvic limb lameness of 3 mo duration. Six years previously, the dog had undergone tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) surgery of the left pelvic limb for the treatment of cranial cruciate disease. On presentation, the dog had a painful and swollen proximal tibia. Following investigation, a diagnosis of osteosarcoma of the proximal left tibia at the site of the previous TPLO surgery was made. This is the first reported case of osteosarcoma following TPLO using an implant other than the Slocum plate.

Category: Knee - Oncology
Authors: Karnik KS, Samii VF, Weisbrode SE, London CA, Green EM.
Journal: Vet Radiol Ultrasound

Multidetector contrast enhanced computed tomography with acquisition of 0.625-mm thick transverse images was used to measure the extent of appendicular osteosarcoma in 10 dogs. The measured length of tumor based on CT was compared to the true length of tumor using histopathology. There was a statistically significant association with good correlation between the true length of osteosarcoma compared to the length of intramedullary/endosteal abnormalities on CT with a mean overestimation of 1.8% (SD = 15%).

Category: Imaging - Oncology
Authors: Goldfinch N, Argyle D.
Journal: J Feline Med Surg

Practical relevance Feline 'lung-digit syndrome' describes an unusual pattern of metastasis that is seen with various types of primary lung tumours, particularly bronchial and bronchioalveolar adenocarcinoma. Tumour metastases are found at atypical sites, notably the distal phalanges of the limbs; the weightbearing digits are most frequently affected, and multiple-digit and multiple-limb involvement is common. Often primary lung tumours in cats are not detected because of clinical signs referable to the primary tumour; rather, many cases present with signs referable to distant metastases.

Authors: Malek S, Murphy KA, Nykamp SG, Allavena R.
Journal: Can Vet J

Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) was diagnosed in the proximal humerus of a dog that was presented with persistent right forelimb lameness with no clinical signs of urinary tract involvement. A diagnosis of TCC was made from surgical biopsy of the humeral lesion with subsequent necropsy revealing the prostatic urethra as the primary site of the tumor.

Category: Oncology
Authors: Helm J, Morris J.
Journal: J Feline Med Surg

PRACTICAL RELEVANCE: Musculoskeletal neoplasia is an uncommon but Important differential diagnosis for cats presenting with lameness, pain or swellings associated with bones and/or soft tissues. The most common tumours of soft tissue origin are the sarcomas (in particular feline injection site sarcomas [FISSs]); the most common bone tumour of the cat is osteosarcoma (OSA). CLINICAL CHALLENGES: FISSs present a clinical challenge in terms of their local invasiveness, difficulty in obtaining complete surgical excision and high risk of local recurrence.

Category: Oncology
Authors: Venzin C, Grundmann S, Montavon PM.
Journal: JSAP

An eight-year-old, neutered female Rottweiler was presented with lameness of seven days duration. Radiographs were consistent with a distal radial bone tumour. Limb-sparing surgery was performed using a commercially available endoprosthesis with a locking bone plate. Histopathological examination of the resected bone revealed an intraosseous fibrosarcoma, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy was initiated three weeks after surgery. Despite initial satisfactory limb function, lameness worsened four months after surgery.

Authors: Dunn A, Buffa E, Hanshaw D, Farrell M.
Journal: Aust Vet J

An Alaskan Malamute underwent unilateral tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) surgery to stabilise a stifle joint with a deficient cranial cruciate ligament. The dog made an excellent recovery with no postoperative complications, until 20 months post-surgery when he presented with acute onset ipsilateral pelvic limb lameness. Osteosarcoma (OSA) was diagnosed adjacent to the titanium implants. Currently, there is a paucity of information on the epidemiology of OSA adjacent to orthopaedic implants in canine patients.

Authors: Anfinsen KP, Grotmol T, Bruland OS, Jonasdottir TJ.
Journal: Can J Vet Res

This is one of few published population-based studies describing breed specific rates of canine primary bone tumors. Incidence rates related to dog breeds could help clarify the impact of etiological factors such as birth weight, growth rate, and adult body weight/height on development of these tumors. The study population consisted of dogs within 4 large/giant breeds; Irish wolfhound (IW), Leonberger (LB), Newfoundland (NF), and Labrador retriever (LR), born between January 1st 1989 and December 31st 1998.

Category: Oncology