Carpus

Authors: Hittmair KM, Groessl V, Mayrhofer E.
Journal: Vet Radiol Ultrasound

Stenosing tenosynovitis of the abductor pollicis longus muscle causes chronic front limb lameness in dogs. The lesion, similar to de Quervain's tenosynovitis in people, is caused by repetitive movements of the carpus. Thirty dogs with front limb lameness, painful carpal flexion, and a firm soft tissue swelling medial to the carpus were examined prospectively. Seven dogs had bilateral abductor pollicis longus tenosynovitis.

Authors: Clarke S, McKee M, Gemmill T, Pink J, Kalff S.
Journal: Vet Rec

No Abstract Available

Category: Carpus - Deformity - Pediatrics
Authors: Pettitt R, Fox R, Comerford EJ, Newitt A.
Journal: VCOT

A four-month-old West Highland White Terrier was presented to the Small Animal Teaching Hospital at the University of Liverpool with the complaint of a bilateral angular carpal deformity. A 20° valgus deformity was present in both thoracic limbs, centred on the distal radial physes. Both distal ulnas were grossly thickened and there was concomitant thickening of the rostral mandible and calvarium. The dog exhibited signs of resentment on palpation of the mandible and signs of pain were elicited on flexion and extension of both elbow joints.

Category: Carpus - Deformity
Authors: Streubel R, Makara M, Guerrero T.
Journal: VCOT

The medical records of three cats that were presented with severe carpal injury requiring radiocarpal arthrodesis were reviewed. Medial plating using the Compact 2.0 LOCK™ systema was performed in all three cases. Although screw positioning may be difficult because of the large distance between the holes of the plate and the relatively large size of screws, plate loosening or metacarpal fractures did not occur. Long-term clinical and radiographic follow-up (6 months to 4.5 years) revealed excellent outcome in two cats. In the third cat, the radiocarpal joint did not undergo complete fusion.

Authors: Szabo D, Ryan T, Scott HW.
Journal: VCOT

Carpal canal syndrome, or carpal tunnel syndrome, is the most common entrapment neuropathy in humans and is caused by compression of the median nerve as it courses through the carpal canal. A similar condition has been reported in horses, however there have not been any reported cases of a dog showing lameness secondary to compression within the carpal canal. This report describes the case of a dog exhibiting lameness secondary to a lipoma within the carpal canal. Lameness improved after surgical removal of the mass.

Authors: Szabo D, Ryan T, Scott HW.
Journal: VCOT

Carpal canal syndrome, or carpal tunnel syndrome, is the most common entrapment neuropathy in humans and is caused by compression of the median nerve as it courses through the carpal canal. A similar condition has been reported in horses, however there have not been any reported cases of a dog showing lameness secondary to compression within the carpal canal. This report describes the case of a dog exhibiting lameness secondary to a lipoma within the carpal canal. Lameness improved after surgical removal of the mass.

Authors: Perry K, Fitzpatrick N, Johnson J, Yeadon R.
Journal: VCOT

Objectives: To report the application and clinical outcome of the treatment of radial carpal bone fracture in five dogs using a variably-pitched, headless cannulated compression screw (Acutrak(R)). Methods: Arthroscopy was performed prior to surgical repair in three cases. In two cases, a fissure within the radial carpal bone was more clearly apparent when oblique indirect illumination was employed at arthrotomy. Following Acutrak(R) screw placement via arthrotomy, external coaptation was applied in all cases for a period of two weeks.

Authors: Ground reaction force profiles after partial and pancarpal arthrodesis in dogs.
Journal: VCOT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare long-term functional outcome after partial carpal arthrodesis and pancarpal arthrodesis in dogs using kinetic gait analysis. METHODS: Fourteen dogs with 19 partial carpal or pancarpal arthrodeses were retrospectively examined and underwent force-plate gait analysis. Mean times since surgery were 29.4 and 24.4 months for pancarpal and partial carpal arthrodesis respectively.

Authors: Ober CP, Jones JC, Larson MM, Lanz OI.
Journal: AJVR

Objective-To characterize the computed tomographic (CT) and cross-sectional anatomic features of myofascial compartments and soft tissue spaces in the manus of cadavers of dogs without forelimb disease. Animals-33 cadavers of adult medium- to large-breed dogs without forelimb disease. Procedures-Forelimbs were removed from the cadavers within 4 hours after euthanasia or within 6 hours after thawing from initial freezing. Specimens were then frozen for variable periods and thawed for approximately 16 hours before use.

Category: Carpus - Imaging
Authors: Calvo I, Farrell M, Chase D, Aisa J, Rayward R, Carmichael S.
Journal: VCOT

Pancarpal and partial carpal arthrodesis were performed in 22 carpi (20 cats) using various surgical methods. Short and long-term outcomes were assessed using a retrospective review of the case notes and via owner questionnaires. Carpal arthrodesis was associated with complications that did not affect the functional outcome, and in most cases, did not necessitate major revision surgery. Following arthrodesis, the cats did not jump as high, and showed a reduction in their willingness to jump and climb.