Carpus

Authors: Harris KP, Langley-Hobbs SJ.
Journal: JAVMA

Case Description-A 6-year-old neutered female mixed-breed dog was evaluated because of a 6-week history of left forelimb lameness that varied in severity. Clinical Findings-Radiography revealed expansile and lytic changes of the left accessory carpal bone (ACB). Results of histologic evaluation of ACB core biopsy specimens indicated areas of bone necrosis. The entire left ACB was excised and submitted for histologic evaluation; results confirmed a diagnosis of idiopathic ischemic necrosis.

Category: Carpus
Authors: Bitton E, Joseph R, Portman L, Segev G, Meiner Y, Shipov A, Milgram J.
Journal: Vet Surg

OBJECTIVE:
To describe the direction and magnitude of the rotation of the radius relative to the ulna during extension of the carpus and to describe the effect of carpal extension on internal and external rotation of the radius relative to the ulna.
STUDY DESIGN:
In vitro experiment.
ANIMALS:
Cadaveric canine thoracic limbs (n = 11).
METHODS:

Authors: Vedrine B.
Journal: Can Vet J

A 4-year-old male Labrador retriever dog was evaluated for acute lameness without weight-bearing in the right forelimb after an 8-meter fall. Radiographs revealed a comminuted fracture of the ulnar carpal bone that required removal of bone fragments. This appears to be the first report of such a condition.

Authors: Nakladal B, Vom Hagen F, Brunnberg M, Gross M, Nietz H, Brunnberg L.
Journal: VCOT

Objective: Injuries of the carpal joint are rare in cats. The most common cause is a fall from a height, known as 'high-rise syndrome'. So far, only limited data about carpal joint injuries (CJI) in cats are available. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology, aetiology, location, and type of CJI in cats. Methods: Case records of cats diagnosed with CJI between 1998 and 2010 were retrospectively analysed. Data concerning signalment, history and type of CJI, accompanying systemic injuries and further orthopaedic injuries were collected.

Authors: Woods KS, Barry M, Richardson D.
Journal: Can Vet J

A 6-month-old male castrated Labrador retriever was presented for coughing and forelimb lameness. Blastomyces dermatitidis was identified in cytology of sputum and synovial fluid. Repeat arthrocentesis 7 months later revealed resolution of septic arthritis. Fungal septic arthritis should be considered for cases of monoarthritis and may respond to oral itraconazole treatment.

Category: Carpus
Authors: Burton NJ, Miles AW, Pollintine P.
Journal: VCOT

Objectives: To describe a novel canine castless partial carpal arthrodesis plate (par-CA) and its ex vivo biomechanical comparison with T-plate and cross pinning techniques for canine partial carpal arthrodesis. Methods: The three implant systems were applied to three cohorts of six forelimbs from Greyhounds euthanatized for reasons unrelated to the study. Intercarpal and carpometacarpal palmar fibrocartilage and ligaments were sectioned.

Authors: Rutherford S, Ness MG.
Journal: Vet Surg

OBJECTIVE:
To report the diagnosis and surgical management of a dorsal slab fracture of the fourth carpal bone in a racing greyhound.
STUDY DESIGN:
Clinical report.
ANIMAL:
Three-year-old, male racing Greyhound.
METHODS:
The fracture was not visible on orthogonal radiographs and the diagnosis was made by computed tomography. Open reduction and internal fixation with 2 countersunk 2.0-mm screws inserted in lag fashion was performed via a dorsal approach. Outcome was analyzed objectively by comparing preinjury and postsurgery racing performances.
RESULTS:

Authors: Woods S, Wallace RJ, Mosley JR.
Journal: VCOT

Objectives: Since external coaptation is applied clinically to prevent plate failure during healing in canine pancarpal arthrodesis (PCA), we tested the hypothesis that external coaptation does not significantly reduce plate strain in an experimental ex vivo model of canine PCA. Methods: Ten thoracic limbs from healthy Greyhounds euthanatized for reasons un- related to the study were harvested and the carpus was stabilised with a dorsally applied 2.7/3.5 mm hybrid PCA plate.

Authors: Meeson RL, Goodship AE, Arthurs GI.
Journal: Vet Surg

OBJECTIVE:
To determine mechanical differences between two plates with different requirements for supplementary casting after pancarpal arthrodesis (PCA): the Veterinary Instrumentation Hybrid Dynamic Compression Plate (HDCP), and the OrthoMed CastLess Arthrodesis Plate (CLP).
STUDY DESIGN:
In vitro mechanical analysis.
SAMPLE POPULATION:
HDCP(n = 10), CLP(10).
METHODS:
Single-cycle load to failure using a materials-testing machine and cyclic loading between 38 and 380 N ± 5% to simulate estimated in vivo loads until failure or 10(6) cycles.
RESULTS:

Authors: Pettitt R, Fox R, Comerford EJ, Newitt A.
Journal: VCOT

A four-month-old West Highland White Terrier was presented to the Small Animal Teaching Hospital at the University of Liverpool with the complaint of a bilateral angular carpal deformity. A 20° valgus deformity was present in both thoracic limbs, centred on the distal radial physes. Both distal ulnas were grossly thickened and there was concomitant thickening of the rostral mandible and calvarium. The dog exhibited signs of resentment on palpation of the mandible and signs of pain were elicited on flexion and extension of both elbow joints.

Category: Carpus - Deformity