Endoscopic surgery

Authors: CHRISTOPHER R. BYRON, DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS 1 , BRITANY M. BENSON, DVM 1 , WILLIAM M. KARLIN, DVM 1 , and ALLISON A. STEWART, DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS 1
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective—To report the use of a proximolateral endoscopic portal with a distolateral instrument portal for carpal retinaculum release in a horse clinically affected with carpal canal syndrome.

Study Design—Clinical report.

Animals—A 4-year-old Thoroughbred female.

Methods—Carpal canal syndrome secondary to traumatic suppurative tenosynovitis was treated by accessory carpal bone debridement and carpal retinaculum release using a tenoscopic approach to the carpal flexor synovial sheath through a proximolateral endoscope portal and a distolateral instrument portal.

Authors: OLIVER M. CROWE, BVSc Cert ES (Orth) 1,2 , RICHARD J. HEPBURN, BVSc Cert EM Diplomate ACVIM 1,2 , SVEND E. KOLD, DVM PhD 1,2 , and ROGER K. SMITH, MA Vet MB PhD DEO Diplomate ECVS 1,2
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective—To report long-term outcome after arthroscopic removal of fragmentation of the extensor process of the distal phalanx in horses.

Study Design—Case series.

Animals—Adult horses (n=13).

Methods—Medical records (2003–2004) of horses that had arthroscopic debridement of fragmentation of the extensor process of the distal phalanx were reviewed. Inclusion criteria included: lameness localized to the foot, fragmentation of the extensor process of the distal phalanx debrided arthroscopically, and a follow-up period of ≥4 years.

Authors: McLellan, J.; Plevin, S.; Hammock, P.D.; BonenClark, G.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Education

Patellar chondromalacia is rarely reported in the horse. In this study, several noninvasive diagnostic modalities were combined to diagnose patellar chondromalacia in a horse, later confirmed by arthroscopy. Radiography failed to demonstrate pathology; nuclear scintigraphy localised the disease process to the left femoropatellar region; and ultrasonography identified pathological changes within the affected joint. It is possible that this disease is under-reported in the literature due to the difficulty in accurately diagnosing the condition.

Authors: NICOLAI JANSSON, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ECVS
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective—To report use of a magnetic retriever for arthroscopic removal of a metallic foreign body from the equine talocrural joint.

Study Design—Clinical report.

Animals—A 2-year-old Warmblood stallion.

Methods—A metallic foreign body was removed from a talocrural joint using a 10-mm magnetic retriever under arthroscopic guidance. Preoperative radiographs were used to locate the intra-articular position of the foreign body.

Results—Six months after surgery, the horse was no longer lame.

Authors: Vanderperren, K.; Martens, A.; Haers, H.; Duchateau, L.; Saunders, J.H.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: Arthroscopy of the fetlock joints is a routine surgical procedure in the horse. It is unclear how much of the articular surface of the condyles of the metacarpal (MCIII)/metatarsal (MTIII) bone can be visualised using either the dorsal or palmar/plantar arthroscopic approach.

Authors: JENNIFER M. COHEN, VMD , DEAN W. RICHARDSON, DVM, Diplomate ACVS , ALEXIA L. MCKNIGHT, DVM, Diplomate ACVR , MICHAEL W. ROSS, DVM, Diplomate ACVS , and RAYMOND C. BOSTON, PhD
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective—To (1) examine the outcome in horses with osteoarthritis or intra-articular soft tissue injuries of the stifle after arthroscopic exploration and debridement and (2) to determine any imaging or surgical findings that may influence prognosis. Design—Case series. Animals—Horses (n=44) with lameness referable to the stifle, diagnosed with osteoarthritis, meniscal tears, or other intra-articular soft tissue injuries based on arthroscopic examination. Methods—Medical records of horses with stifle lameness that had arthroscopic exploration were reviewed.

Authors: Laurie R. Goodrich DVM, MS, PhD and C. Wayne McIlwraith MS, PhD
Journal: Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice

Arthroscopic complications are infrequent but when they occur can cause significant morbidity in the equine patient. This article reviews intraoperative and postoperative complications along with ways to avoid them. Additionally, therapeutic methods of managing these complications also are discussed.

Authors: J. Declercq; A. Martens; D. Maes; B. Boussauw; R. Forsyth; K. J. Boening
Journal: Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology

The objective of the present study was to determine clinical and arthroscopic characteristics associated with dorsoproximal proximal phalanx (P1) fragments in Warmblood horses, as well as to examine their histopathological appearance. One hundred sixty-eight fragments were removed from 150 fetlocks of 117 Warmblood horses. Details of signalment and results of clinical examination were collected prior to surgery. After arthroscopic fragment removal and joint evaluation for synovial and/or cartilage abnormalities, the fragments were measured and evaluated histopathologically.

Authors: Muurlink, T.; Walmsley, J.; Young, D.; Whitton, C.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reason for performing study: Current noninvasive techniques for imaging the soft tissue structures of the stifle have limitations. Arthroscopy is commonly used for the investigation and treatment of stifle pain. Cranial and caudal arthroscopic approaches to the femorotibial joints are used. However, complete examination of the axial aspect of the medial femorotibial joint (MFTJ) is not possible currently.

Authors: ROLFE M. RADCLIFFE, DVM, Diplomate ACVS, JON CHEETHAM, Vet MB, Diplomate ACVS, ABRAHAM J. BEZUIDENHOUT, BVSc, DVSc, NORM G. DUCHARME, DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS, and ALAN J. NIXON, BVSC, MS, Diplomate ACVS
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective—To describe anatomic considerations and arthroscopic technique in horses for arthroscopic removal of palmar/plantar osteochondral fragments from the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint.

Study Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—Adult horses (n=4) with osteochondral fragments of the palmar/plantar PIP joint.